Social Media Report - Friday 8th July 2016

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Snapchat teens wince as it catches on with oldies

Parents have started creeping onto the messaging app Snapchat, a social-media outlet long dominated by teens. A recent comScore report found Snapchat was ‘breaking into the mainstream’, calculating that 38% of US smartphone users aged 25 to 34 are now on Snapchat, as are 14% of those 35 and older. Three years ago, those numbers were 5% and 2%, respectively. The trend resembles the way parents moved to Facebook years after it was adopted by college students, and Snapchat is now more popular - and more mainstream - than ever. The Wall Street Journal, NASA, the White House and CNN all have an official presence on the app, and although younger users have been lamenting their parents' presence on the platform for some time, Snapchat has not lost its popularity with its core user base. The percentage of 18 to 24-year-olds using the app has continued to climb from 44% to about 68%. ‘Historically, those concerns about losing core users have been overblown,’ commented comScore’s Andrew Lipsman, who says he has not seen much change in usage by teens.

Stephanie Marchbanks said she joined Snapchat to learn what keeps her teenage son Timothy glued to his phone. She now shows her children how to use features like adding stickers to a video. ‘I put a cat filter on my face,’ revealed the 56-year-old freelance writer, who says keeping up with Facebook’s ‘noisy commentary’ is exhausting. When Mrs Marchbank’s son was asked his opinion on her Snapchat presence. He replied: ‘It’s weird.’Stephanie Marchbanks said she joined Snapchat to learn what keeps her teenage son Timothy glued to his phone. She now shows her children how to use features like adding stickers to a video. ‘I put a cat filter on my face,’ revealed the 56-year-old freelance writer, who says keeping up with Facebook’s ‘noisy commentary’ is exhausting. When Mrs Marchbank’s son was asked his opinion on her Snapchat presence. He replied: ‘It’s weird.’.

PR and Marketing in Social Media

Barclaycard partners with BuzzFeed and Snapchat for 50th birthday campaign

Barclaycard is celebrating its 50th birthday with an integrated and personalised marketing push, in a tie-up with Snapchat and Buzzfeed. The campaign also highlights the company’s long-term partnership with Hyde Park’s British Summer Time music festival, and centres around the concept of a ‘Great British Music Showdown’. Barclaycard is teaming-up with BuzzFeed to launch the biggest ever search to identify the UK’s ‘musical DNA’. Users will be asked to complete an online quiz to identify their personal musical ‘makeup’, which will be aggregated with the responses of other users to discover Britain’s musical preference region by region, be it indie, pop or hip-hop. BuzzFeed readers who complete the quiz will receive a ‘dancebot’ – a personalised animated avatar – denoting which musical tribe they belong to. The site will update the nation’s data every day and the country’s final DNA will be unveiled at the end of July.

To reach the important millennial audience, the company will become one of the first financial brands in the UK to promote the campaign using a Snapchat advert. Barclaycard will use the messaging apps updated Snap Ads service, which consolidates 3V products (vertical, video and views) to develop interactive action-oriented units. The company’s chief marketing officer Katherine Whitton said she believes the platform is doing ‘some really, really exciting things that allow brands to engage in a really authentic way’.

Social Media Brands...

Identity fraud rises as thieves 'hunt' on social media

Fraud prevention service Cifas reports that the number of victims of identity theft has risen by 57%, with its analysis of data from 261 UK companies suggesting fraudsters are increasingly harvesting personal information from social media networks. Cifas counted more than 148,000 victims in the UK in 2015 compared with 94,500 in 2014, and warned that Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn had become a ‘hunting ground’ for identity thieves. Some personal details were found by hacking computers but increasingly fraudsters used social media to put together the pieces of someone's identity. Cifas is urging people to check privacy settings and think carefully about what information they share online. Regional figures show Manchester and London witnessed the biggest increases in ID theft last year.

Cifa chief executive Simon Dukes said: ‘The likes of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other online platforms are much more than just social media sites - they are now a hunting ground for identity thieves. We are urging people to check their privacy settings today and think twice about what they share. To a fraudster, the information we put online is a goldmine.’

Banks trial payment by Facebook or Twitter

Bank customers may soon be able to transfer money using their social media usernames instead of account numbers and sort codes, following a trial in Singapore at the beginning of next year. The pilot scheme will let users of 20 banks immediately wire money to payees who have linked their public social media profiles with their bank accounts, by selecting their Twitter handle or Facebook ID. The trial is the latest move by lenders to bring their services in line with the digital age as banking apps continue to grow in popularity. It also follows the launch of online-only banks without bricks and mortar branches and standalone money transfer apps such as Splittable and Venmo. The pilot is part of a strategy to develop ‘a system for the future’ with the capability to store multiple proxy IDs, according to a person working on the project.

US Facebook users are already able to wire money to their friends on the social network’s Messenger service free of charge, while Snapchat users can also make payments to their contacts using ‘Snapcash’. Elsewhere, a bank in India has introduced a payment programme that allows its customers to transfer money using their social media accounts, including WhatsApp.

Graham Norton denies reports he has left Twitter

Graham Norton has denied reports that he has ‘fallen out of love’ with Twitter and has decided to quit the social network as it is ‘not a happy world’. The chat show host had made the comments on his Radio 2 show, telling listeners he plans to stick to Facebook from now on. ‘I prefer Facebook because I have real friends who agree with me. But on Twitter, not so much,’ Norton said. The presenter, who has more than 1.2 million followers, was thought to have posted his last ever tweet on 22 June, although his account was still posting retweets to his agony aunt column in the Daily Telegraph.

However, Norton has now reappeared on the platform with a tweet denying he had ever left. The Irish presenter wrote: ‘Not sure where the Norton quits Twitter story came from. Clearly it’s not true. Hello Twitter!’.



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