Millennials in the Workplace

The data reveals further insights into the habits, motivations and attitudes of these commercially and culturally important go-getting millennials.

A recent Mashable article argued that Millennials, or Generation Y, people born between 1981 and 1999, are striving for a stronger work-life balance compared to previous generations. The latest Great Britain Kantar Media survey shows that this is not the case, with this group more career ambitious than ever in such a competitive job market. The data reveals further insights into the habits, motivations and attitudes of these commercially and culturally important go-getting Millennials.

Over the years, the Millennials have become more career-minded compared to Generation X or the Baby Boomers. From 2006 to the present, there has been a 15% overall increase of Generation Y saying they want to get to the very top in their career. In comparison, over the same period, Generation X has seen an 11% overall decrease in agreement with this attitude and the Baby Boomers have had an 8% overall decrease.

With many Milliennials underemployed in their jobs, making money is a top priority compared to previous generations. Only 53% of this group say that how they spend their time is more important than the money they make, whilst 59% of Generation X and 60% of Baby Boomers agree with this statement.

Because Generation Y is so ambitious and keen to get ahead, their jobs take priority over leisure time, with the former spilling over into the latter. Millennials are 45% more likely than the average British adult to worry about work during their leisure time compared to those in Generation X, who are just 23% more likely. Baby Boomers, however, are 62% less likely than the average British adult to worry about work during their leisure time. One reason for this group worrying less about work is that they are reaching the end of their careers and approaching retirement.

Despite being a time-poor group and difficult to engage, Millennials can be a marketer's closest ally because they talk to many different people and products and services. Using TGI's Word of Mouth segmentation, marketers can see that Millennials are 27% more likely to have talked about jobs and careers in the past 12 months. 22% of this group are quite or very likely to convince others on the subject of jobs and careers, making them 50% more likely to do so than the average adult. They are also more than twice as likely as the average to post comments or reviews on websites about jobs and careers.

Using the latest insights from TGI Clickstream, a unique survey that combines TGI’s breadth and depth of offline consumer insight with passively-measured online behaviour, marketers can take a closer look at the online habits of Millenials. This group is 26% more likely than the average adult to say they cannot live without the Internet. They are also 60% more likely than the average British adult to use the Internet more than seven hours a week (on weekdays). When online, Millennials are 81% more likely than the average to be learning languages and 72% more likely to be downloading or viewing free films, series or documentaries.



Search article


OUR SOLUTION


Consumer behaviour: profile, segment and reach the right people
Read more

RELATED CONTENT


Reaching the luxury consumer has never been more important
Read more
Do you know who your REAL Facebook friends are?
Read more
What drives fitness fiends to embrace technology?
Read more