Engaging the food delivery addicts

Food delivery services today are big business. In recent years a large number of apps have sprung up competing with each other for a piece of the lucrative food delivery market, from Uber Eats, to Just Eat, to Hungry House. Meanwhile some of the high street’s most successful and longstanding fast food eateries have changed the habit of a lifetime and embraced food delivery, with the likes of McDonald’s and KFC getting in on the act in recent years. But which consumers are driving take up of fast food delivery and how can they best be engaged?

Almost three million adults use fast food services once a week or more

Latest data from our Great Britain TGI study reveals that 5% of British adults (2.8 million people) use fast food delivery services once a week or more often, with over a quarter of all adults (13.7 million people) using them once a month or more.

Proof of how lucrative a business this is can be revealed by the fact that 58% of those who use fast food delivery services once a week or more spend £15 or more on fast food per person when they order.

Parents of young children have a high tendency to rely on delivery services

It is the younger adults and parents with young children who are most likely to be heavy users of fast food delivery services. They are two thirds more likely than the average adult to be aged 25-34, 39% more likely to be in the TGI Lifestage group ‘Fledglings’ (aged 15-34, not married or living as a couple, do not live with son or daughter, live with parents) and 65% more likely to be in the group ‘Playschool Parents’ (live with son/daughter and youngest child is aged 0-4).

To these regular food delivery users, spending money comes easily. They are twice as likely as the average adult to agree ‘I tend to spend money without thinking’, 82% more likely to agree ‘I spend a lot on clothes’ and 62% more likely to agree ‘I am no good at saving money’. They are also more likely to admit to being influenced by advertising, with the TGI study data revealing they are 64% more likely to agree ‘Advertising helps me choose what I buy’.

Gaming looms large in the lives of many frequent delivery users

When it comes to their media engagement, video games are one potentially efficient means to reach them. They are 90% more likely to agree ‘Advertising within video or computer gameplay enhances the realism of the game’ and 85% more likely to agree ‘My video game characters/avatars are important to me’. They are particularly likely compared to the average adult who plays video games to play ‘Counter Strike’, ‘Need For Speed’ and ‘Rock Band’.

Indeed, a range of media can prove efficient at reaching these frequent delivery service users. They are 77% more likely to amongst the heaviest fifth of consumers of mobile internet, 65% more likely to be amongst the heaviest fifth of consumers of cinema and 54% more likely to be amongst the heaviest fifth of consumers of internet. Drilling down further we can examine their media consumption at a more granular level and discover campaign efficiencies.

Our TGI Clickstream study includes measurement of actual, passively collected online behaviour (both PC and mobile devices) and reveals that heavy users of fast food delivery services are particularly likely compared to the average adult who accesses the internet via smartphone to, ‘in the last 7 days’, have been on the Shazam app, as well as 55% more likely to have been on the ITV Player app and 54% more likely on the Kik Messenger app.



Search article


KFC customers - the power of difference
Read more
Consumer & Audience Targeting
Read more
Consumer Behaviour
Read more